Starsight

All her life, Spensa has dreamed of becoming a pilot. Of proving she’s a hero like her father. She made it to the sky, but the truths she learned there were crushing. The rumours of his cowardice are true – he deserted his flight during battle. Worse, he turned against his own team.

Spensa is sure there’s more to the story. And she’s sure that whatever happened to her father could happen to her. She’s heard the stars too – and it was terrifying. It turned her world upside down. Everything Spensa has been taught is a lie.

But Spensa also learned a few things about herself, too – and she’ll travel to the end of the galaxy to save humankind if she needs to.

After ploughing through Skyward in a couple of days, I quickly picked up Starsight, the sequel to Brandon Sanderson’s story about space pilots fighting a seemingly endless war against an alien race known as the Krell. Like I mentioned in my Skyward review, aliens aren’t really my thing, but after spending two books with Spensa and her multi-planetary (and species) war, I might be willing to change my stance.

There are a lot of aliens in this book. But I’ll get to that.

I’m not going to lie, diving pretty much straight from Skyward to Starsight was a bit of a disorientating experience. There’s a time jump between the events at the end of book one and where Starsight picks up. It’s been six months – and a pretty significant six months at that. The people of Detritus, Spensa’s home planet, have seen their knowledge advance a lot since the reveals at the end of the first book in the series, and while in a lot of ways this was no bad thing – it certainly pushed the story into some new and surprising territory quickly – I did find myself feeling a little bit robbed. After gradually putting the pieces together throughout the first book to finally understand Spensa, her father and what really went down that fateful day he appeared to abandoned his army in the midst of battle, missing out on much of the development of that understanding meant that the start of Starsight did fall a bit flat for me.

But don’t fear – Brandon pulled it back. It becomes apparent within a couple chapters that he made the choice to skip over six months of Spensa’s life because he had something big in mind.

Those other planets that were hinted at during Skyward are explored during Starsight, and it’s quite a ride. As I’ve mentioned, this book things get fully alien, and we find ourselves up close and personal with the Krell (who it turns out are crab people); diones, who tend to be either blue, red or purple and are non-binary; the kitsen, who are tiny fox people; and figments, which are invisible – plus a very scary murdery force out there in the stars which I won’t go into. It’s really better if you learn about those guys yourself.

Much like in the first book where Sanderson used a story of war as a way of thinking about courage, Starsight is more than anything a novel about compassion. When Spensa first encounters the other alien races that populate Starsight she sees them as just that – alien. Other. Not on her side. What becomes increasingly apparent though is that this war Spensa has spent her entire life consumed by is a lot more complicated than she had ever imagined. She comes into the situation as the persecuted party, but as she experiences more of the war from the other side she starts to realise that her own race isn’t blameless. And not only that, but the alien races she is surrounded by maybe aren’t so alien after all. What it means to be ‘human’ – from M-Bot’s struggles to make decisions independent of its AI’s programming, to the dione who wants to be a soldier even though that really isn’t something diones do – is the overarching theme, and I was 100% here for it.

I’m not going to lie, Starsight is not what I was expecting. Spensa spends the vast majority of the story away from Detritus, and therefore the flight team I fell in love with in book one, and while to start off with I felt pretty resentful about that (I love those guys!), the unexpected places Starsight took me had me sucked in again in no time.

Bring on book three. Soon please.

Author: Lydia Tewkesbury

27. Loves a good story.

14 thoughts on “Starsight”

  1. I love when an author knows the big picture beforehand and every decision (e.g. time jumps) is completely justified in the end. This kind of reading experience is what I look for and I’m glad to see how this series is allowing you to open to alien-filled science-fiction stories! Great review! 😀

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I know right?! It is quite literally a whole new world for me.

      Yes – I feel totally confident that Sanderson knows where he’s going with this thing. Apparently he has a huuuuge back catalogue as well so I’m excited to get further into his books.

      Liked by 2 people

  2. Alien huh? I don’t see you give stars ratings. If you have to, what would book 1 & 2 be? I so like books taking place in space. I think this author has another well known series isn’t it? I don’t recognize the titles of this series you are reading.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ooh good point – I never do the stars thing but I probably should. Hmm.. I would probably go a three and a half for both. They are both really fun, but there are aspects of the writing that jar with me a bit – though I did find that I got used to them the more I read.

      He does! My housemate lent me these books and he said another series by Sanderson I need to pick up is Mistborn. From what I’ve seen around here as well that’s his other big series, but he seems to be a very prolific writer so there’s lots by him around.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Oh I didn’t know about the time jump- I can see why that would make the end feel a little flat. I love that this deals with complexities of war- that sounds really interesting. And really glad it ended up sucking you in. Fantastic review!

    Liked by 1 person

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