Broke Bookworm

broke

Books cost money. This simple fact is one that I didn’t much consider when I decided to become a book blogger. At the time, I was just coming to the end of being a student, and while anticipating some, was not ready for quite the level of difficulty I would go on to have securing any kind of full time, permanent employment.

I am just starting my fifth job since graduation, in all its minimum wage glory.

When you’re working your way out of your overdraft, buying books gets difficult to justify.

This post is for any of the other broke bookworms out there.

I share your frustration.

I understand the intense feelings of book-related FOMO you experience when you log on to WordPress and see the new releases everyone is losing their shit over. I too have considered adding many a shiny new tome to my already spiralling credit card debt.

(Don’t do it. Trust me.)

I get the panic that nobody will visit your blog anymore because you’re writing about that random book from the library you’d never heard of rather than the latest time travelling romance.

I suggest using financial difficulties as reading opportunities. I, for example, picked up To Kill A Mockingbird at the library a couple weeks ago out of sheer desperation and now when the next person asks me what my favourite book is, I think I have an answer for them. To be totally honest, I would not have read it if it weren’t for a lack of other, newer options.

(A review is coming once I can gather my thoughts beyond OMG! LOVE! I SHOULD CHANGE MY WHOLE LIFE! LOVE! HEARTBREAK! I WILL NOW APPROACH ALL RUDE CUSTOMERS IN MY RETAIL JOB IN THE MANNER OF ATTICUS FINCH!)

I also totally get how annoying it is when you go to the library and all they have is sequels. What is with that anyway? Did they just never get the first book or did someone like it so much they decided to keep it forever, fines be damned? Also, why is the YA section all at least 5 years old? And why is so much of it by Andy McNab?

These are all questions the poorly funded library system is ill equipped to answer.

My technique for getting through this trying time so far is to reread everything. Books were not designed to be read once and filed away. They always have more secrets to share, if only you’re willing to take a second, third, fourth look. The book you really liked when you were 15 might even change your life at 23. All those books you spent your better funded years accumulating aren’t just decorations, after all.

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Author: Lydia Tewkesbury

24. Loves a good story.

1 thought on “Broke Bookworm”

  1. Great post, it’s obvious you have a passion for reading. You need to use that passion as your “why” to change your ability to enjoy what makes you happy. The only thing standing between you and your passion is your financial struggles. But you have an advantage that most broke people don’t… you love to read. There are several book recommendations on my blog as well as dozens of articles that can help you get a great perspective on money . Hope this helps. Also why such difficulty finding a job if u just graduated?

    Like

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